Loving languages

spanish-wanderlust:

I like the way you are

spanish-wanderlust:

I like the way you are

123spanish:

Heres a map of Spain

123spanish:

Heres a map of Spain

(via laslanguesromanze)

guide2germany:

He never forgot her.He forgot, she never (did).

guide2germany:

He never forgot her.

He forgot, she never (did).

(Source: samimilliondollarsmile)

sandraness:

Oui, J’aime!
ankeweckmann:

Aimez-vous ce pull? (Do you like this sweater?

sandraness:

Oui, J’aime!

ankeweckmann:

Aimez-vous ce pull?
(Do you like this sweater?

(via laslanguesromanze)

bellalinguista:

영원히 언어학이랑 인지심리학: michaonthemoon: yaoibutts: I love how potato in French is pomme de…

michaonthemoon:

yaoibutts:

I love how potato in French is pomme de terre, which pretty much means “earth apple.”

like what stupid frenchman saw this:

image

and said “zis petite légume looks like a, how you say, APPLE! hmmm… but it grows in ze earth… HON HON HON! MAIS OUI! C’EST UNE POMME DE TERRE!”

j’adore comment ananas se dit pineapple en anglais, ce qui veut littéralement dire “pomme de pin”, genre quel type anglais a vu ça:
image

et s’est dit : “ow cette étrange big fruit ressemble à une, how do you say, POMME! hmmm… mais plutôt une pomme qui pousse dans les pins… HU HU HU! OH YES, IT’S A PINEAPPLE!”

(z’avez vu, on peut le faire aussi… hon hon hon!)

when people ask ridiculously vague language related questions with no context.

atanei:

dave-penn:

‘how long does it take to learn a language?’

languages



‘what language is the best for job prospects?’

image

‘which language is the easiest to learn?’

image

 
“which is more useful, chinese or arabic?”

image






And the last but not the least:

But why have you chosen Swedish (or name any other not so popular language) to learn?

Or “What are you ever going to do with [insert any language]?”
I guess communicating with people whose languages I speak is an option…

Random Thought for the Day

deutschtaeglich:

absumaul:

deutschtaeglich:

I love that if you know a word, for example, a verb like decken (to cover), it is easy to figure out the noun (die Decke- ceiling, blanket) and any variation of the verb (ex. entdecken-lit. uncover/discover). It’s always so logical too!

You’ve got to of course guess the gender of the noun, but… x) This is a very good point

Yeah, that’s true, but sometimes the ending or origin makes that task easier!

Here’s another hint: To make abstract nouns, so if you want to express a condition, a quality or a characteristic, simply take an adjective which you would use to describe a condition etc. and put either -heit or -keit at its end. The correct article here is easily found: The resulting nouns are all female.

examples: schön -> die Schönheit
schüchtern -> die Schüchternheit
freundlich -> die Freundlichkeit
tapfer -> die Tapferkeit

This works about 90% of the time. Some adjectives either simply don’t work that way or the resulting noun is fairly uncommon, though possible. Such as gut -> die Gutheit (rare, one would rather use die Güte instead, yet it depends on the context as it’s not a completely working synonym)

 

allaboutchinese:

各自人生,冷暖自知。Everyone’s got a life that no one else knows about.

allaboutchinese:

各自人生,冷暖自知。
Everyone’s got a life that no one else knows about.

(via hidden-dragon-of-the-east)