Loving languages

Anonymous said: I want to learn another language but people tell me not too. Im too stupid because i have dyslexia. Should I learn one anyway?

foreignfawn:

polyglotbyluck:

Ugh. People. 

I promise you, you are absolutely not too stupid to learn a foreign language. Especially not because you have dyslexia. Actually, dyslexics often have an above average intelligence, and just have issues reading. 

As someone who is dyslexic myself, yes, sometimes learning a different language can be difficult, but it is most definitely not impossible. There are also ways of finding tricks and tips to learning, and depending on what language[s] you’re interested in, I may be able to help with that! [Although each person is different and has different learning styles and needs.] Don’t give up on your dreams/interests/likes just because there are some small-minded people out there. 

Please, please, message me off anon and I can talk to you more about this. I will reply privately if you prefer. 

Not to mention, many people who have dyslexia in English sometimes do not have dyslexia in other languages, especially other languages that don’t use the English alphabet like Chinese.

Never let anyone tell you that you’re “too stupid” to learn a language.

jaimetalangue:

First, all those greetings are all over France, not only in Paris.

And my theory about them is that we wish the person a good whatever that’s remaining of their day/week/weekend/holiday/etc.

Like, in the morning you wish people « bonne journée », but from twelve you wish them « bonne après-midi », and later you wish them « bonne fin d’après-midi ». In the evening (from 5pm) you wish them « bonne soirée », but later you have to wish them « bonne fin de soirée ».

jaimetalangue:

First, all those greetings are all over France, not only in Paris.

And my theory about them is that we wish the person a good whatever that’s remaining of their day/week/weekend/holiday/etc.

Like, in the morning you wish people « bonne journée », but from twelve you wish them « bonne après-midi », and later you wish them « bonne fin d’après-midi ». In the evening (from 5pm) you wish them « bonne soirée », but later you have to wish them « bonne fin de soirée ».

(via a-language-a-day)

Anonymous said: What are the most FAQ of spanish that a intermediate level should know about? Thank you in advance!

spanishskulduggery:

  • The differences between ser and estar
  • The differences between por and para
  • The differences between preterite and imperfect
  • Knowing how to do preterite yo forms of -gar, -car, -zar, and -guar verbs
  • How to recognize subjunctive, even if you haven’t learned it yet… but at least present subjunctive
  • Using the gerund/progressive forms
  • How to do direct objects
  • How to do indirect objects 
  • How to do direct + indirect objects
  • Being sort of aware of reflexives at the very least… at least knowing what reflexives are and how you would do them
  • conmigo, contigo, consigo… and when you’d use mí / ti / sí to mean “(to) me / you / him or her”
  • Knowing the irregular forms of the verbs ser, estar, ver, hacer, decir, saber, venir, tener, poner, poder, and ir in all of the forms of the verbs that you’ve learned up to this point
  • Possibly knowing the difference that preterite and imperfect makes with verbs like querer, no querer, poder, saber, tener, and conocer
  • When to use y and when to use for “and”
  • When to use o and when to use u for “or”
  • When the verb should be in the infinitive form and not the progressive/gerund -ing form
  • At least a small understanding of the functions of haber to mean “there is / there are”… if you haven’t yet gotten to the perfect tenses with haber
  • Knowing not to capitalize nationalities
  • Knowing the difference between Querido/a and Estimado/a in a letter
  • Knowing phrases with tener like tener sed, tener hambre, tener sueño, tener ___ años, and others
  • How to tell time in Spanish using ser
  • Potentially using ser in the imperfect for telling time in descriptions e.g. Eran las tres “It was 3 o’clock”, era la una “It was 1 o’clock”
  • Knowing that numbers after 200 change depending on the subject they modify e.g. doscientos chicosdoscientas chicas
  • Using buen, mal, and gran when they’re in front of masculine nouns
  • Using primer ”first” and tercer “third” in front of masculine nouns
  • Knowing the numbers 1-1000 at least
  • Knowing that dieciséis, ventitrés, and ventiséis have accent marks
  • Especially knowing the irregular quinientos / quinientas “500” and novecientos / novecientas “900”
  • Knowing how to tell someone the date in Spanish
  • Knowing how to tell someone the year properly in Spanish; dos mil catorce = “2014”; mil novecientos cuarenta y cinco = “1945”… and never un mil 
  • Knowing that only sábado and domingo appear in plural; los sábados “on Saturdays” and los domingos “on Sundays”… but then los lunes / martes / miércoles / jueves “on Monday / Tuesday / Wednesday / Thursday”
  • Knowing the days of the week and the months of the year
  • The importance of the ñ especially when you have things like ano “anus” vs. año “year”
  • Knowing how to do stem-changing verbs O=>UE e.g. dormir, morir, soler, and mover [and sort of jugar as well]
  • Knowing how to do stem-changing verbs E=>IE e.g. sentir, sentar, preferir, and mentir
  • Knowing how to do stem-changing verbs E=>I e.g. pedir, decir, and vestir
  • Knowing how to do verbs that have the present yo as -zco, and subjunctive -zca, -zcas, -zcan etc. e.g. conocer, conducir, merecer, and amanecer
  • Being aware of some false cognates like excitado/a meaning “sexually aroused” instead of emocionado/a “thrilled / excited”… or that el éxito is “success” and not “exit”
  • Being aware of some partial false cognates like pretender sometimes meaning “to pretend”, but more often meaning “to attempt” or “to assume”
  • Knowing how to pronounce Spanish letters and phonemes
  • Sort of being aware that sometimes gender rules in Spanish aren’t totally uniform… like el agua, el alma which are technically feminine but have masculine articles… or that it’s el sofá, el poema, el clima, el planeta, el día and la radio (usually)… maybe not 100% aware of why it is the way that it is… but having some knowledge of it helps
  • Being at least marginally aware of what vosotros / vosotras is even if you’re not using it.
  • Same as above but with el voseo

And I’m sure there are others that I’m missing, or some things others might find important… these are just some of my most common questions… not just in intermediate, but in general.

Because questions about advanced Spanish tend to be more imperfect subjunctive / conditonal / future… or they deal with specific verbs and words… not overall grammatical concepts.

Vocabulary sort of depends on how people are learning / how they are taught.

Obviously I would say you should know the seasons, some names of buildings like “library” or “museum”, and the weather… but whether or not you’ve gotten to the human body, or movie vocab, or vocab for cars… depends.

Of course, speaking and writing (with correct accent marks) are also important, but it’s harder to say how well someone should be at something, given that people are better at learning different things… and so much of it depends on situational learning, rather than harping on someone’s incorrect accent marks at all times

Satan: [appears]

Satan: You can have anything you wan--

Me: LANGUAGE.

Satan: What?

Me: GIVE ME EVERY LANGUAGE.

Satan: What the--?

Me: YOU SAID ANYTHING. GIVE ME EVERY LANGUAGE IN THE WORLD.

Satan: Wouldn't you rather have love or money?

Me: EVERY. LANGUAGE. MASTERY OF EVERY LANGUAGE. NOW.

Anonymous said: Would french people laugh if your name was connor?

awesomefrench:

ilmaimait:

enattendantlesoleil:

awesomefrench:

enattendantlesoleil:

awesomefrench:

Why would they laugh? O.o

ilmaimait THIS IS FOR YOU

REMEMBER THE STARBUCKS INCIDENT OMFG

You said too much Anastasia, I want to know now.

image

avoue que c’est parfait

For those who were curious

omg

I Take Up Languages

polyglotbyluck:

I had a little too much spare time on my hands, and so I decided to start something new. Most people, when found with a little extra time during summer vacation, would start a new hobby like crafting or gardening or such. 

I started learning Hebrew. 

Hahaha, welcome to the dark side 😄

(via a-language-a-day)

Anonymous said: Hey! I've just seen the "Call Me Maybe" cover video in old english and I was wondering if you know why old english is so different from modern english. Because I have studied spanish literature and, for example, the "Mío Cid" is written in old spanish (12th century) and it has its differences with modern spanish but it is understandable. Thank you! Love your blog!

mediumaevum:

In short - all languages evolved through centuries, but perhaps none as much as English. The language people spoke on The Islands was shaped by people who “visited” them. And by visited I mean invaded. First wave brought Jutes, Angles and Saxons who brought Germanic influences. Combine them, and you get Old English. Then the Vikings came, later Normans, this time bringing French influences, and word by word, the language was shaped into what we can read in, for example, Shakespeare. This is the first point when we could go back in time and, without many difficulties, understand the language.

And thanks for writing!

(And here is a more detailed look)

Hex

linguistikforum:

"Bist du eine Katze?"

linguistikforum:

"Bist du eine Katze?"

(Source: der-flix.de, via gtgabroad)